Harkness Mansion and Garden

Harkness Mansion and Garden

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Description

The manor “Eolia”, called after the island building of the Greek god of the wind, was constructed in 1906 and bought by Edward and Mary Harkness in 1907. Over 200 acres were occupied by a workers’ ranch, and the manor was a Harkness joliday house. The house in the style of the Roman Renaissance with 42 bedrooms and was projected by the architectural firm “Lord and Hewlett”.

Beginning in 1909, architect James Hambel Rogers planned the reconstruction of the house in the style of classical Renaissance, a gazebo (tea room) and a carriage ( supporting facility). At this time Rogers also participated in the planning of the western park with the Brett & Hall company.

Beatrix Jones Farran (landscape architect, one of the co-founders of the American Society of Landscape Architects) worked on the redevelopment of the West Park from 1918 to 1929. He also designed and set up the East Garden, the Boxwood Parter and the Alpine Rock Garden. In 1950, the property was handed over to the United States in Connecticut.

Restoration

As part of the design, the manor and gardens in the park were rebuilt to the existing circumstances in the beginning of the 1930s.

The $3.8 million restoration effort commenced on November 4, 1996 under the supervision of prime contractor Thomas Kronenberger and his sons, Inc. of Middletown, Connecticut.
The upgrade corresponds to the historic nature of the site. The electrical, heating and plumbing systems were structurally renovated and upgraded. All woodwork, the walls, ceilings and floors of the building were dismantled and painted or repaired.

Friday
  • Open 24 hours
Saturday
  • Open 24 hours
Sunday
  • Open 24 hours
Monday
  • Open 24 hours
Tuesday
  • Open 24 hours
Wednesday
  • Open 24 hours
Thursday
  • Open 24 hours

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