Gertrude Jekyll Garden at the Glebe House Museum

Gertrude Jekyll Garden at the Glebe House Museum

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Along Gleb House and Gertrude Jekyll Garden share two distinct tales. Situated in the scenic Litchfield Hills in Woodbury’s historic center, Glebe House provides an insight into Connecticut during the Revolutionary War. The rustic but stylish 18th-century country house is the house of Woodbury’s first bishop, Reverend John Marshall, his wife Sarah and their nine kids, who used to reside in Glebe during the riots of the American War of Independence. The New England Anglicans, like the Marshallese, experienced persecution at the time of the war because they were supposed to be loyal to the King. Just weeks after U.S. independence was achieved, a band of bishops gathered in secrecy at Glebe House to take the crucial step of participating in the construction of a new nation while preserving its spiritual legacy. As a consequence, the Glebe House is regarded as the Bishopric’s home in the New World.

The Glebe House was rebuilt in 1923 by William Henry Kent, a pioneer of earlier American ornamental design in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The Glebe House, which was one of the nation’s earliest historical buildings, was established in 1925 and began to be used by visitors.

In 1926, the famous English garden designer and writer Gertrude Jekyll (pronounced Jeek uhl) was commissioned to plan an “old-fashioned” garden to enhance the newly created mousse. Jekyll had a profound influence on modern garden design and is considered the greatest gardener of the 20th century. Although she has completed a small garden in England and on the continent, compared to more complex projects she completed about 400 years ago, the Glebe House garden includes 300 feet of classic English style with mixed edges and foundation plants. For reasons unknown today, the garden planned by Miss Jekyll was never fully installed in the 1920s, and its very presence was neglected. After the plans were rediscovered in the end of the 1970s, the design was started in earnest and is now being finalized according to the initial plans.

 

Gertrude Jekyll Garden at the Glebe House Museum

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