Liliuokalani Garden

Liliuokalani Garden

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The beautiful Liliuokalani Garden is located on Banyan Drive (Banyan Drive) in the historic city center of Hilo, one of the largest authentic Edo-period gardens outside of Japan. In 1907, Queen Liliuokalani donated 5 acres of land to create a park. In November 1917, the Legislative Council for the Management of Public Land extended it to 17 acres. The garden is named after Hawaii’s last monarch, Queen Lilio Kalani, and was opened in 1919 to pay tribute to the Japanese immigrants who first established Hawaii’s agricultural history that began in 1868.

The Lili’uokalani Garden includes stone lanterns imported from Japan, sculptures, arched bridges and pavilions since 1916. Liliuokalani Park is made up of several teams who plan, care for and invest in development resources. The Hiroshima Japan Women’s Friendship Association and the Hiroshima Trade Committee have made a great contribution to the beautiful park today.

The Liliuokalani garden introduces the style of plants and buildings derived from traditional Japanese temples and gardens. If you walk along Waihuai Pond, cross the red arched bridge over Koi Pond, visit the pagoda and the traditional Japanese “Matsuroan” tea house, you may feel like you are in a temple in Kyoto. The park is strategically located with panoramic views of Hilo Bay and Mokuora (Coconut Island), also known as “the island of life”. With a footbridge leading to Coconut Island, this is a great spot for a picnic and enjoys sweeping views of Hilo Bay and Hilo’s Old Town. There was a Hawaiian temple dedicated to the art of healing.

This garden is perfect for morning jogging, Tai Chi and yoga. Why not stroll along the twisted oasis path and enjoy the pleasant scenery? Ponds, bridges, sculptures, etc. They can be photographed or used as romantic wedding backgrounds.

The Lili’uokalani Garden is so beautiful that it was selected by the United States Postal Service in 2016 to inspire United States Priority Mail stamps to commemorate Hawaii.

Tuesday 5:45AM–7:30PM
Wednesday 5:45AM–7:30PM
Thursday 5:45AM–7:30PM
Friday 5:45AM–7:30PM
Saturday 5:45AM–7:30PM
Sunday 5:45AM–7:30PM
Monday 5:45AM–7:30PM